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Middleham Racing Tours
Middleham Racing Tours gives you the opportunity to get up close and personal with the stars of the north's premier racehorse training centre.
The famous training centre is home to around 15 racehorse trainers and over 500 horses.
The centre has grown considerably over the past 10 years and now hosts three all weather gallops, numerous grass gallops aswell as an impressive schooling ground, enabling horses to be taught to jump in a safe and enclosed environment.
Middleham is ideally situated within close proximity to over 15 racecourses, providing great opportunities for horses to run in 100's of races, all within a stone's throw from home. It is therefore not surprising that some of the country's top flat and jumps trainers have decided to set up training in this beautiful town.
When you decide to book on to one of Middleham Racing Tours packages you will be provided with a unique chance to see just how these equine athletes are trained and looked after in their own environment, as well as meeting their trainers and the staff who look after them.

History

Middleham is known mostly for three things its connection with King Richard III, Its magnificent Castle (King Richard's childhood home) and more recently the horseracing industry.
The Sport of Kings can be traced back to the area for over 200 years but the Cistercian monks of nearby Jervaulx Abbey were breeding horses long before this. The first documented reference to racehorses in Middleham was the establishment of Isaac Cape as a jockey in 1733 he eventually became the first specialist racehorse trainer in the area. Since then many famous racehorses have been trained here both on the flat and over jumps these have included Derby winners Pretender 1869 and Dante 1945 and Grand National winners Sheila's Cottage 1948, Teal 1952 and Merryman II 1960 trained by the late Neville Crump from Warwick House Stables.
Combined with its deep history as a training centre Middleham also hosted racing on the High Moor during the 18th century with the first meeting recorded in 1739. A dispute between the local gait owners (landowners with grazing rights on the moorland) and trainers saw the last race held on the Moor in June 1873. From then onwards the High Moor has been used only for training. By this point racing was already embedded within the community. In more recent times Middleham is established as a leading training centre in the UK where fifteen trainers are based. The facilities and layout have continued to improve allowing trainers to send out fit and competitive athletes and have been rewarded with further success at the top level.Middleham Racing Tours gives you the opportunity to get up close and personal with the stars of the north's premier racehorse training centre.
Middleham is home to around 15 racehorse trainers and approximately 500 horses. The centre has grown considerably over the past 10 years and now hosts three all weather gallops, numerous grass gallops aswell as an impressive schooling ground, enabling horses to be taught to jump in a safe and enclosed environment. Middleham is ideally situated within close proximity to over 15 racecourses, providing great opportunities for horses to run in 100's of races, all within a stone's throw from home. It is therefore not surprising that some of the country's top flat and jumps trainers have decided to set up training in this beautiful part of the world.

There have been racehorses trained in this area for over 200 years but the Cistercian monks of nearby Jervaulx Abbey were breeding horses long before this. The first documented reference to racehorses in Middleham was the establishment of Isaac Cape as a jockey in 1733 and he eventually became the first specialist racehorse trainer here. Racing was established on the High Moor as early as 1739 and meetings were held regularly during the 18th century. The last race to be held on the Moor was in June 1873 after disputes between trainers and local gait owners (landowners with grazing rights on the moorland). From then onwards the High Moor has been used only for training. By then though racing was an important part of Middleham's life and so began the history of famous trainers settling here and sending out winners at all of the leading meetings in the country. One of those trainers was Captain Neville Crump who turned out three Grand National winners from his famous yard Warwick House Stables (Now part of Mark Johnston's training establishment) - Sheila's Cottage (1948), Teal (1952) and Merryman II (1960). He also trained five Scottish and two Welsh National winners! Captain Crump died in 1997 aged 86 and is buried in Middleham cemetery.
Another outstanding trainer was Sam Hall with winners of the Ayr Gold Cup, Ebor Handicap (three times) The Yorkshire Cup, the November Handicap (five times) the Cesarewitch, the Lincoln Handicap, the Magnet Cup and the Royal Hunt Cup, to name a few - His niece Sally Hall now occupies Brecongill Stables.

At this moment in time there are some fifteen training establishments. With good modern facilities it continues to prosper as a leading training centre. There was a time in the late 70s and 80s when Middleham suffered a downturn in fortunes and there were some empty yards during that period. However the training facilities were improved and Middleham now boasts its own grass and all-weather gallops on the Low and High Moors.